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AYEL

14.10.2021 - 04.12.2021

ESENTAI GALLERY presents the solo exhibition of Askar Esdaulet "AYEL" (translated from Kazakh - Woman).

The exhibition presents more than 20 works in the technique of sculpture (bronze, stone, cast iron and aluminum), paintings (canvas, oil) and graphics. Most of the works were created in the last period of 10 years and are presented to the viewer for the first time.

"Woman is Woman"! - Askar Esdaulet begins his dialogue, talking about the concept of his works, slightly joking, ironic, but always admiring and elevating the image of a Woman, proclaiming her strength in wisdom, ability to find solutions and her unique perception of the world.

The shapes of the female body have always been present in the works of outstanding masters of previous epochs and often carried special sacred and religious meanings; referring to the female image as to the pristine beauty, to her constantly changing forms, her role in the society, strength and ability to influence the course of many historical events.

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Askar Esdaulet pays special attention to the interpretation of the female image through cultural, everyday aspects and connection with the past. In his works, the Woman appears before the viewer in a sacred image - the image of Mother, reuniting the artist and the viewer with the sources of their origin. Woman, Mother, Muse and Patroness are shown to us in the form of an allegory, and her images combine a set of completely different artistic gestures. What kind of woman is she, who the artist again and again refers to and is there an answer to this question, or does the artist leave the answerfor the viewer?

Askar’s woman is not alone: in almost all of the author's works, they are depicted accompanied or surrounded by other participants, the main "companion" is often a man or a bull. The image of a bull symbolizes strength, divinity, or vice versa, a number of elemental forces of nature and is one of the most significant sacred animals at the dawn of ancient paganism in many cultures. One of the famous bulls in ancient Greek mythology is the Cretan bull or Marathon bull. It was this bull that brought Europe - the daughter of the Phoenician king to Zeus. The animal on the author's canvases complements the image of the Woman, merging into one whole, but at the same time retaining its expressiveness and individuality.

The artist works at the intersection of subject about the past and the present, male and female, life and death, traditions and modernity, ancestors and descendants; looking for the forms to express feelings, emotions of a person. Speaks about love, about the connection between the sexes, referring to paganism, religious, traditional symbols and images. For example, his work with cast iron: "I am sure that it is cast iron that is able to convey the voice of the past centuries and the depth of national images", from the interview of A. Esdaulet to Alla Dubrovina, 2008. These sculptures have a special texture, rustiness, which the author deliberately sought in order to age items, giving imagery and expressiveness. “I created items, it seems to me, that convey the connection between contemporary art and the aesthetics of ancestors.”

About the author: Askar Esdaulet (born in 1962) is the artist who has gone through the influence of the AcademicSchool Kasteev, the modern conceptual view of the "father" of the Shymkent artistic avant-garde Vitaly Simakov, as well as training at the sculpture department at the Theater and Art Institute. In 1991 Askar went to live in France, where he later worked as a guest artist for four years. The author's works are in private and in the collections of local and international museums.

Maria Peskova, curator of the exhibition

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Address: Al-Farabi 77/8,
Almaty, Kazakhstan, 050040
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Admission to exhibitions is free